Monday, July 19, 2010

Monday 19 July

~  As we are not seeing any other human beings today, we can have plenty of chopped spring onions in our lunchtime sandwiches.  I rather like their American name, scallions.  The ones you buy here are large and bulbous, the long straight ones seem to be unknown.


~  Molly's friend Moos is unusually pleased to see us when we go to take him out for a walk in the afternoon, while E, his human companion, is out for the day visiting friends; he's often rather reluctant to leave home with us.  The dogs skip across the low trickle of the stream and up into the woods, but fairly quickly tire of the heat and the prickles of the cut furze on the path in their feet.  We head back to the garden for a bit of stick chasing instead.

~


More insex, damselflies this time.  I'll be getting a strange reputation if I keep this up.  I mean, what is he doing  there, with the end of his lower body holding her between head and thorax ?  I'm sure one of my bona fide naturalist blogging friends can answer that: I'm really just an anthropomorphic voyeuse.  Still, at least you don't have to get insects to sign a release paper when you take their photos in intimate situations.  Crow wondered what happened if they are startled into flight in this state; the answer is nothing at all, it happens quite frequently, and they just carry on regardless.  On a somewhat more anodyne note, see how the blackberries are setting fruit...

7 comments:

Zhoen said...

Plant and insect-sex, together. An orgy.

julie said...

Those damselflies are simply lovely; like seeing a stained-glass window come to life to enclose a new pane.

Plutarch said...

How refreshing to see blackberries are still regarded in some quarters as fruit rather than telephones!

HKatz said...

I like the delicate blue of the damselflies; and there's a certain elegance and choreography to their mating (at least as it comes across in your photo).

And I love scallions; whenever possible, I heap them into salads, sandwiches, also onto yams cooked in olive oil.

Nimble said...

My entomology is weak but my googlefu is pretty good. Here's a page about the nuts and bolts of dragonfly joinings. Complicated as expected. I like the near focus with blurred green bkgrd you got here.

My captcha is "beldude". The hip counterpart of the beldame I suppose.

A Write Life said...

Lovely image.

Lucy said...

Thanks.

Nimble, that's a terrific link, images and information both great, thanks.