Wednesday, January 09, 2008

Just popping out to buy dogfood...

A couple of days after New Year, and the stocks of human comestibles were still fairly plentiful - the last morsel of Christmas pudding was put out for the birds just the other day, the blue tits seem to like it though they do a lot of beak wiping afterwards. However, dog croquettes were very low, and the particular brand My Lady is recommended to eat by veterinarians is, for some reason, only sold in garden centres.

Cheapcam has the advantage of being easily slipped into a pocket, and the act of doing so, even if perceived by mine spouse, seems to occasion less in the way of eye-rolling and comments along the lines of 'so you won't be back for lunch then', then does the act of slinging the larger camera round my neck.

The garden centre of a morning turns out to be a rather good place to take photographs. The wide perspex type roof makes for a good diffuse light. Cyclamen are amongst the most popular post-Christmas flowers,
along with some rather blousey tulips disporting themselves to be pollinated by insects that never come.

I couldn't quite decide which what the object of focus ought to be, petals,

or stamens?

Hardly anyone was there, except the staff doing general housework duties.

The agaves were prickly customers, always rather frightening in their solidity, and hostile with thorns to any who get too close.

while the phormium presented a friendlier, more candy-striped aspect.

I pursued the theme of stripes, patterns and rhythm through the department of plant pots ( I've been reading my photography books you see...),


which also caution against over use of diagonals and dynamic tension:


' Just as the use of bright vibrant colours is instantly effective in an individual photograph but can become mannered if used constantly, so this kind of activation can also become wearing after a while...It's effect is usually spent very quickly, and the eye moves on...' (The Photographer's Eye, Michael Freeman, bloody good book in fact).

But I couldn't resist the bright colours of this range of kids' garden tools either,

and I was rather taken with the way sneaky little Mickey Mouse peers through the prongs of the miniature rake; the pure-hearted little sons and daughters of French soil may seem to be innocently being encouraged to participate in working the lands of their forefathers, but in fact they are really being inveigled into the evil empire of Uncles Walt and Sam! Nothing is as it seems...

I also couldn't resist the corniness of photographing myself taking the picture in the reflective surface of a vitreous green planter. I can see the shape of my finger coming up off the shutter. I'm quite glad I'm not a sophisticated clever photographer really, little things...


Anyway, the Powershot returned yesterday. I am smiling a lot. Even Tom says it feels as if the family is complete again. But I'll perhaps try to remember to keep the cheapcam in my pocket.

19 comments:

Zephyr said...

OOOooooo!!
It's a grey day here and these are just the ticket to wake up my foggy head. Don't you love having a camera that fits in the pocket?? I'm having so much fun with the one Santa brought me...and you've inspired me to remember it when i go shopping

marja-leena said...

These are taken with a 'cheapcam' ?!? Methinks it's the person behind the camera... Brilliant, and just what I need to wake me up this dark rainy morning.

stitchwort said...

The pocket-sized camera gets taken along and used, while the big camera with its bulky lenses is often too much effort.

You have got some super pictures here.

tristan said...

lovely pictures, hooray !

jzr said...

Love those flowers especially at this time of year! Great work!!

zhoen said...

The camera matters far less than the photographer. I feel like I've been peeping through a keyhole. Keep the little sister in your pocket, please.

Catalyst said...

Cheapcam or Powershot - it's the eyes that count. And Lucy Belle, you've got 'em!

leslee said...

Fabulous. I need to go visit a plant house somewhere soon, always a joy when it's winter here and nothing's blooming except the Christmas cactus in the house. Lovely shots. Glad to her your prodigal has returned to the fold, too.

Sheila said...

I love the plant pots shot.

I don't see Mickey in the rake photo; are we supposed to be able to? Maybe I just don't have the eyes for it?

Lee said...

You did have fun!

Lovely photos, thank you.

moe lauher said...

Hmm, I'm stuck - trying to decide if your gift is writing or photography. You do both so well.

julie said...

Marvelous, Lucy - it's all in the eye of the beholder, not the camera lens, as these photos clearly demonstrate.

Dick said...

Great pics, Lucy. In 2008 I'm going to get busy with our new Eos. But I won't get anything close to these for quality.

Lucy said...

Cheers, m'dears.

In fact it's the light that's important with the simpler camera; a number I took of orchids indoors in more subdued light were no good at all, though the flash on the littl'un is actually a bit gentler than the Powershot one, which I hate.

But the chance of a reasonably crisp image without flash whatever the light is much better with the latter, along with the zoom of course. It's a bridge not a reflex, so there's no faffing about with lenses, which I don't feel I'd be doing with very often, but with its lense hood and UV filter it's a bit big for a pocket.

However, when a large number of shots don't come out well, that actually cuts down on the decision making process as to which to keep and which to ditch, which is quite refreshing, and I never grieve for the ones that didn't make it!

Lucy said...

Oh yes, Sheila, Mickey's in the second rake picture, top left.

herhimnbryn said...

Great shots Lucy. I think you are right, you will have to keep the little camera in your pocket.

What's the nursery song?.....'Lucy Locket had a pocket......'

Robin Starfish said...

In a way you've dispensed with cameras altogether, as you teach us not merely what to see, but how.

Avus said...

A good photographer can "make music" even with a pinhole camera. You have the eye, Lucy and any camera will do for you.
I always carry my little Fujifilm E550 with me - it is so easy and quick to use, where the SLR is bulky and complicated and tends to get left at home.
If you are into photography books can I recommend "An English Eye" - the photography of James Ravilious. He worked in black and white, on 35mm film and I just sit and look in wonderment and worship! It was published a month ago.

meggie said...

Just wonderful pics.
I used to take my children to Garden Centres when they were young, & we would spend long happy hours mingling with the plants. I usually let them choose something to take home for a 'pet'. We lived in an inner city Hotel, so had no garden, or pets. They tell me they remember those magic visits.