Monday, June 01, 2015

Ploumanac'h Plage, pink granite and sea pinks


Some picturesque pictures of a particularly pretty place.


















(also present: pelagic puffins, pipits, promenades pluvieuses and pleasures a-plenty. Some of which photographed well and some less so; maybe more later)

10 comments:

Catalyst said...

Positively phenomenal photos!

Natalie d'Arbeloff said...

What is behind that tiny doorway at the bottom of those wonderful stone steps? I want to go in there!

marja-leena said...

Perfectly pretty place!!

Zhoen said...

Glaciated then carved, a hewn landscape. Amazing.

polish chick said...

i love those stairs!

Anonymous said...

Tis I, your Herefordshire admirer, but for reasons which may become apparent, I'm reduced to sailing under a flag of inconvenience.

You appear to be passing round a coastline once influenced by Henry Moore. Here I'm exposed to larger sculptures fashioned by a larger hand - the Pyrenees. While I, small-handed in the extreme, shuffle around words compiled a couple of years ago in the hope that they'll eventually make sense. On holiday in Autignac, 15 km north of Béziers, though if you saw me you'd hardly detect any difference from Herefordshire.

So here's an anecdote.Autignac has a Café de Commerce which is horribly difficult to understand. Do they do lunches? Well perhaps. May the four of us sit down (outside) and live in hope? A horrible frown passes over the face of the bar-hand and it appears we may not sit down. Except that he fails to add the word "outside". Somehow we are to infer - no more than that - that we may sit down inside. Inside the bare walls resonate shockingly, offering the acoustics of Big Ben. Two males eating close by drown out the waitress's explanation from which only the word rouget emerges. That's a fish, I say stupidly. In fact she was saying that wine is compris. We ask for white but that is, inevitably, unavailable. I expected no less.

It seems that the preliminaries of lunch have been set in train but what will be served? This is important since Ysabelle's partner, Daniel, has notoriously limited enthusiasms. We try, inconspicuously, to check the plates of starters whizzing by and finally identify melon slices and jambon cru. Fine. But try as we might we are unable to identify the main course until it is plonked in front of us. Mercifully it turns out to be chicken breast (one of Daniel's few preferences). By the time the desserts are listed I'm almost willing to accept iles flottants simply because in the crashing babble it is the one thing I can readily recognise. Pride forces me ask again and I'm glad to accept a slice of cherry tart.

I thought of you throughout, glad you were resident 500 miles away, unable to view my minor Calvary with a sardonic eye. Not that I've ever seen you practice sardony but I feel sure you hold it in reserve.

Avus said...

Lovely area and good pics, Lucy. I, too, was going to mention Henry Moore but I see that RR has beaten me too it.

Lucy said...

Thank you people, it was a good trip. We've visited the area before in the past, but not to look so closely at either rocks or birds for a long time.

Cat - pleased to please!

Natalie - I did have a look in, but I'm afraid it's simply a dark damp sapce. I thought it might be some kind of oratory, but more likely it was some kind of storage to do with the lighthouse above, or perhaps the fortifications and artillery structures which peppered this coast. But it is enticing isn't it?

ML - pip pip!

Z - it really is remarkable, and very rare, in terms of the stone itself and its formation, some particular combination of granite and oxide and glaciation. It's very popular and much photographed but still succeeds in inspiring wonderment.

PC - I very much like those kind of combination of the random natural rock formations and the man-made constructions and geometry here, endlessly charming.

Robbie - Thanks for looking in from such far-flung parts, have a good holiday! I would not be sardonic if I could (I'm not sure I am capable of sardony but like the word), since I have been in too many similar situations and fully expect to be again, being the chief francophone can be an onerous role. I am simply glad for you that you pulled off chicken breast and cherry tart, which sound more than satisfactory under the circs.

Avus - Thanks, do you know the area? I shall try to find a few more images of interest!

Soize said...

Tes photos sont superbes !!

Pam (Isabelle) said...

Lovely pictures as usual. You have the advantage over me that your chosen subjects aren't 2 and 3 and rushing around. Also you're a better photographer...