Sunday, November 13, 2011

Pretty pink pomegranate pictures







 



13 comments:

Zhoen said...

Glowing and glistening.

zephyr said...

Yum!!
i miss the ones from the trees i grew up with. Not only are the ones that get shipped here too expensive, they are also too sweet.
And i miss the jelly from those tart-sweet fruits. My niece made some, from that desert place, and sent me two jars last year, for Christmas. i've only just opened the second jar...my favorite jelly. ever.

Bruce Taylor, a.k.a. Catalyst said...

One of the first places we lived, in the Phoenix area, had a hedge of very tall pomegranate trees loaded with the fruit. We didn't know at the time that it was something good to eat!

HKatz said...

Most of them are indeed pretty (and sparkle like gems), but the third one looks like a pulsating alien egg sac...

Rouchswalwe said...

Mmmm. Edible granite-like goodness.

earlybird said...

yum!

But surely they don't grow in Britanny do they?

Fire Bird said...

ooh they're so weird. never sure how I feel about them...

Barrett Bonden said...

So little jelly, so much fibre. Do you or anyone you know chew then swallow the lot?

marly youmans said...

Remember the pomegranates at my grandparents' homes in south Georgia: much smaller fruit but wonderful-looking on the trees.

Also always think of the daughter of a banana baron who talked about living in Columbia, and how one of the maids would pick pomegranate seeds and make into a huge shining mound in a giant bowl. Now that's wrong. Harvest your own, seed by seed! Or beg your mama...

Lucy said...

Thanks. This is a different method of seed collection from those I've tried previously, introduced to me by Plutarch: prick the skin and plunge in boiling water for a few minutes then pull the skin off the whole, thereby not cutting through any seeds. You are lfet with a glistening ball which you can pull apart easily. I thought it would be less visually pleasing then cutting them into quarters, but in fact the irregular rose quartz effect of it was rather appealing.

The resulting bowl of seeds - yes we do munch them up whole of course - is just to be dipped into by the handful.

I enjoyed all your pomegranate stories!

Plutarch said...

The neighbour of a friend in Cyprus used to offer pomegranate seeds in dishes much as we serve nuts with a glass of wine. The fruit was not conidered ripe until it split leaving the exploding pods of seeds exposed, which brings to mind th fact that the French word for pomegranate is "grenade" which gives us the name of the nasty little hand- propelled bomb which it to some extent resembles. I don't remember the tip about soaking the fruit in boiling water before peeling it. I don't think I could have given it you. But I will try it. Tomorrow. I always chew the seeds. Kernel and all.

Lucy said...

Well, that's odd, I'm sure it was you, you're the only person I remember having a conversation about pomegranates with! Perhaps it wasn't a question of soaking it, merely of pulling the skin off the whole fruit rather than halving or quartering it, and I made up the bit about the boiling water. It worked anyway, though I'm not sure how much difference the boiling water made.

I'll check the last post I did on the subject, about 4 years ago at least...

Zhoen said...

Either way, I found a pomegranate today, and thought of this, and will give it a go in a few minutes.