Sunday, June 24, 2012

Kettle's Yard: places to sit

Mulling a bit over responses to Kettle's Yard, mine and yours, and matters of how we live, where we live.  

Meanwhile, though we can't live in a museum, and though we aren't allowed to touch the mobiles or pebbles or paintings, you are very welcome to sit on any of the seating, of which there is plenty, and people sometimes do.



This lady works here, so she probably gets to try out all the chairs.  And there really are a lot of lovely chairs.






















and a couple of sofas too, though I didn't see anyone sprawling on those.
~
(Tom says if this England - Italy match goes into extra time he's going to bed.  Molly's snoring insouciantly, she'd rather be watching the all-black version of Julius Caesar on BBC4).

11 comments:

Ellena said...

What a lovely museum this is.
Any seat would do.

Lorenzo da Ponte said...

A terrifying thought: having tried out the the bentwood chair placed under the crockery corner cupboard, I get up abruptly (moved by some profound thought contained in the Mr and Mrs Peg early reader series) and my head brushes past three shelves of priceless pot. My body adopts a foetal crouch and I am left like the bridegroom in a surreal wedding where the confetti turns out to be shards of fractured porcelain.

Women who work in boulangeries often have deep-seated emotional problems. An earlier French teacher (pleasingly called Aida - even though I am not a Verdi fan) confirmed this and I believe I have used Box Elder to advance this thesis before. Aniane has four boulangeries: one run by a charming, witty lady who responds encouragingly to my French but regularly sells out of croissants early in the morning. The other three conform to the norm and are run by women with dark souls. One - po-faced and angry - supplied me with four croissants two of which had been violated and smeared internally with Nutella. This is a mere footnote to an earlier post of yours which I missed by being away. I couldn't match your list of boulangerie genuses but I am, as it were, able to take things in a different direction

marly youmans said...

Violated by Nutella!

* * *

I crave those Windsors, though they look quite nice where they are.

HLiza said...

i can imagine i will be attracted to the chairs too.. so many different ones; and looks comfy. i left a comnent about the pebbles earlier but dunno if it webt through. but i had enjoyed the tour of this place so far. so unique!

and tom and molly sure add some colours too on this post!

HLiza said...

i can imagine i will be attracted to the chairs too.. so many different ones; and looks comfy. i left a comnent about the pebbles earlier but dunno if it webt through. but i had enjoyed the tour of this place so far. so unique!

and tom and molly sure add some colours too on this post!

HKatz said...

That sofa in the last photo is begging to be sprawled on.

Anil P said...

A museum where one can sit is a museum one can absorb. And nice seating too, almost homely.

marja-leena said...

Lovely museum of many things, like chairs in this case! I rather like the piano room with its lovely light, especially in the 9th photo. Odd to me are the art works hung barely above floor level.

Lucy said...

Thanks all.

Ellena, indeed. I appreciate your appreciative responses to these posts!

LdP - bravo, you have wrought a compelling narrative from a fairly run-of-the-mill photo post! As to the boulangeres, I'm afraid I've not really got to know any well enough. The hairdresser in Moncontour, Mireille (someone once remarked you couldn't even say that name without a kind of bitter grimace...)rather conforms to your description though. She takes it out on the world with scissors and hair dye; many a woman of a certain age from hereabouts sports a mahogany-hued haircut of shockingly hacked bluntness.

Marly - thanks for doing the rounds! Yes, poor croissants, it's a shocking image isn't it? I love Windsors, especially wheelbacks, I grew up with a fine set which my brother still has.

Hliza - glad you like it. We did go to bed before extra time thank goodness, it would have been another dreary 40 minutes before a pointless penalty shoot-out. I'm barely able to muster much interest for this Euro football thing. I did have this daft dream that Wayne Rooney was tearfully apologising to me about it - I told him it really didn't matter!

HKatz - it does look comfy doesn't it?

Anil - yes, it really is unusual like that. It is in fact a department of the university, but open to all to use, and people often sit and use the library there - I've a friend who says he spent long hours there on winter afternoons when he lived there.

ML - I have the impression the pictures are moved about quite freely, and are treated much as if they were still in a private home. Many are at the intimacy of chair height, others are just leaning on the wall on the floor. The potential for damage is slightly alarming - Lorenzo's colourful scenario above is not altogether impossible! I guess they reckon that trusting people to go carefully is a price worth paying to create such a uniquely calm and welcoming atmosphere.

Glenn said...

Its an odd thing but, upon seeing this batch of photos, I immediately was reminded of the old Thames & Hudson book called Greek Style, which I have adored since it came out in 1989. I don't know why this should be so, but all that austere wood, the plentiful use of what seem to be naturally dyed textiles, the low down seating etc, there are so many parallels!

Lucy said...

Hey Glenn, where are you? I tried to e-mail you in response to this but your hotmail address seems to be down; can you get in touch? - mine is lucy-dot-kmptn-at-gmail-dot-com

I'll try you again, tried via your google profile page too...